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What caused my gun to jam?

Overview

There can be a number of reasons that cause a gun to jam. 

Look carefully at the problem area:

Many times we get calls where the person can't describe exactly what the problem is. This makes phone diagnosis very difficult. The best thing to do when you get a jam is to really look things over well - even make notes as to what you see.

Be Careful-Especially with Jams Involving Live Ammunition!

Keep the rifle pointed in a safe direction, until you figure out what has happened.

As you inspect your rifle, ask yourself these questions...

Look at the bolt carrier through the ejection port.

  • Is it fully forward?
  • Is this a failure to fire or a failure to feed?
  • Is there a round in the chamber? If so, keep the rifle pointed in a SAFE DIRECTION.
  • Is it a fired case?
  • Is this a failure to eject?
  • Did the hammer actually fall?

Here are a few hints as to what the trouble MIGHT be:

The rifle has jammed and...

  • Bolt is Stuck Halfway - Two Rounds in Front, One Spent, One Live.
    • Probable Cause: Extractor or Spring.
  • Bolt is Stuck Halfway - One Spent Round in Front, Crushed.
    • Probable Cause: Ejector or Spring.
  • Bolt is Stuck Halfway - No Rounds Present.
    • Probable Cause: Hammer or Firing Pin (Occurs usually when cycling action by hand).
  • Bolt is Stuck Halfway - Live Round in Chamber!!!
    • Probable Cause: Disconnector Failure.
  • Bolt is Closed - Louder than Normal Firing Noise, Unable to Pull Bolt Back.
    • Probable Cause: Case Head Failure.
  • Bolt is Closed - Hammer Won't Fall.
    • Probable Cause: Disconnector/ Hammer problem.
  • Bolt is Closed - Hammer Won't Fall.
    • Probable Cause: Debris Between Trigger and Safety.
  • Bolt is Closed - No Round in Chamber.
    • Probable Cause: Gas Ring Gaps Aren't Staggered.
  • Bolt is Closed - No Round in Chamber.
    • Probable Cause: Magazine Failure.
  • Bolt is Closed - No Round in Chamber.
    • Probable Cause: Broken or Loose Gas Key Screw.

 

This is not a complete list, but if you haven't found the solution to your problem here, please call us. We'll be glad to help you sort it out.
 

The best way to avoid malfunctions (jams):


1. Use good quality ammunition from a reliable manufacturer.
2. Clean your weapon frequently and lubricate it properly (don't over-lubricate!).
3. Practice, practice, practice. Most malfunctions occur during the initial break-in period.

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